Welcome!
 
  • Home
  • News
  • Explanation of Grandfathering and Exemptions in SB 683

Explanation of Grandfathering and Exemptions in SB 683

13 Feb 2018 10:35 AM | Henry Buchtel (Administrator)

The document below was prepared to help clarify the language and intent of the grandfathering and exemptions sections in the acupuncture licensure bill (SB 683).


MAAOM_SB683_FAQ_18_04_25.pdf


Acupuncture Licensure Bill

SB 683


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)


(Updated 4/25/18, replaces 2/18/18 version)



List of Questions and Answers (see below for detailed response)


Q: Is acupuncture licensed in other states?


A: Yes, a license is required to practice acupuncture in 46 out of 50 states.


Q: If I am practicing acupuncture in Michigan but do not meet the national standards for licensure, will SB 683 stop me from practicing acupuncture?


A: You may be qualified to be grandfathered into licensure.


Q: Will SB 683 prevent me from doing acupressure, cupping, homeopathy, dietary counseling, and other un-regulated activities?


A: No, it will not affect previously un-regulated activities.


Q: Will SB 683 allow ADS’s to continue performing the NADA protocol for substance abuse?


A: Yes, ADS’s can continue to perform NADA.


Q: Will acupuncture be covered by insurance after SB 683 passes?


A: SB 683 will remove barriers to insurance, but does not require it.



Q&A with explanations and references


Q: Is acupuncture licensed in other states?


A: Yes, acupuncture is a licensed profession in 46 out of 50 states.


Nevada was the first state to legalize acupuncture in 1974, and Kansas was the most recent state, passing legislation in 2017. The remaining 4 states are Oklahoma, South Dakota, Alabama, and Michigan.


Q: If I am practicing acupuncture in Michigan but do not meet the national standards for licensure, will SB 683 stop me from practicing acupuncture?


A: You may be qualified to be grandfathered into licensure.


The grandfathering section of SB 683 was written to include individuals who have been practicing legally in the state, but whom did not graduate from an ACAOM-accredited program and cannot sit the NCCAOM national board exams.


These individuals will have a 12-month window to apply to the state board and demonstrate through written documentation that:

  • 1.     They have completed a systematic acupuncture education.
  • 2.     That in the 3 years preceding the application, they have used acupuncture to treat an average 250 patient visits per year.
  • 3.     That they have used acupuncture to treat patients with general health conditions.

The intent of this section is to allow individuals meeting these requirements to be grandfathered into licensure.


See Section 16515(2)(B) and the corresponding portion of Section 16525.


Q: Will SB 683 prevent me from doing acupressure, cupping, homeopathy, dietary counseling, and other un-regulated activities?


A: No, it will not affect previously un-regulated activities.


Although many of these activities will be included in the scope of a licensed acupuncturist, the intent of SB 683 is to create broad exemptions for the performance of previously un-regulated procedures, and will not affect the ability of unregulated professions such as life coaches, dieticians, nutritionists, naturopaths, homeopaths, and herbal medicine practitioners to continue doing their jobs. SB 683 will only restrict the performance of acupuncture and moxibustion to licensed acupuncturists.

See Section 16513(2)(D)


Q: Will SB 683 allow ADS’s to continue performing the NADA protocol for substance abuse?


A: Yes, ADS’s can continue to perform NADA.


SB 683 creates a specific exemption for certified Acupuncture Detoxification Specialists (ADS) to continue performing the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol for the prevention and treatment of substance use disorder.

See Section 16513(C)


Q: Will acupuncture be covered by insurance after SB 683 passes?


A: SB 683 will remove barriers to insurance, but does not require it.


This bill does not require 3rd party or workers comp. reimbursement, but its passage will remove some of the barriers to insurance coverage for acupuncture.


Insurance companies in most other states include some degree of coverage for acupuncture. In Michigan, some insurance companies cover acupuncture when performed by a physician, but not when performed by an acupuncturist. Licensure will remove the barriers that contribute to this situation and bring Michigan up to the level of other states in the Great Lakes region.


If you have further questions please don’t hesitate to contact the MAAOM Legislative Committee members below:


Henry Buchtel, Chair

Email: henry.buchtel@gmail.com; cell: 734-845-8550

Gigi Cristache, Vice-chair

Email: 5acupuncturewellness@gmail.com; cell: 248-790-4061

Kristin Whitfield, Member

Email: kvwhitfield@gmail.com; cell: 774-722-3218


© 2015 Michigan Association of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine


Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software